Are you dreaming of a white Christmas…


 

Why not treat yourself or someone you love to a fantastic teeth whitening! We have a range of ‘in-chair’ and ‘take home’ bleaching systems to suit your needs and budget. Check out our website or give us a call to discuss your options today! Tel (03) 9575 1100

wwww.eastbentleighdentalgroup.com.au

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Use it or Lose it!


Most private health insurance covers go by calendar year and don’t accrue so if you haven’t used your yearly limit it dissapears when the clock strikes 12 on new years eve. Have you used your 2 check-up & cleans?  We are preferred providers for Medibank Private, Bupa, Australian Unity & HCF, who provide most preventative treatment with no or little out of pocket expense. Of course we can claim all other private dental insurance cards here on our premises.

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Do you have a teen dental voucher at home?


 

 

 

Well get in quick because they expire 31thDec. There’s nothing better than seeing your childs beautiful smile on Christmas morning so why not schedule your teen in for their preventative check-up & clean? Teenagers are in a high risk time for dental decay, as they may have more control over their diet and may not be as vigilant with their oral hygiene. Just mention you have a teen voucher when booking & bring your voucher & Medicare card to the appointment, we can then do the claiming for you!

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A Special Thank you!


A LETTER FROM A RECENT PATIENT
Can you please pass on my very special thank you’s to Dr Harry and Dr Barry for my procedure yesterday! Abd everyone that was involved! From the moment I met Dr Harry he has made me feel so much more confident in dentistry again, it’s been a long time but I can honestly say I’m on the road to visits without feeling scared 😊 and not only that, he has made me feel very special on all the visits I’ve had so far! He’s a darling!

And I would also like to say a special thank you to Dr Barry because thanks to him I don’t remember a thing from yesterday, haha and that’s exactly how I like it to feel! He looked after me so much and was so beautiful. He also has looked after me from the moment i met him, just wonderful, and what an incredible team all of you have there!

Myself, my husband and our 3 children are very lucky to have found you!

See you guys soon!

M

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Even cars have teeth!


We can fix them too ….a small project we are working on 🙂

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Number of dentists grows


 

The number of dentists working in Australia is rising, and capital cities continue to have more dentists per capita than other areas, according to a report released today by the Australian institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Trends in the Australian dental labour force, 2000 to 2009, shows an overall increase in the supply of dentists (including dental specialists) across Australia in the decade to 2009—from 46.9 to 54.1 practising dentists per 100,000 people.

The number of dentists per 100,000 people in Major cities was double that in Outer regional areas, and almost triple that in Remote/Very remote areas.

“While the number of dentists in regional and remote areas is still well below major cities, there have been increases in the number of dentists in all remoteness areas between 2000 and 2009,” said AIHW spokesperson Professor Kaye Roberts-Thomson.

These increases have ranged from 9 per cent in Outer regional areas to 40 per cent in Remote/Very remote areas.

Supply was highest in the Australian Capital Territory and lowest in Tasmania and the Northern Territory, with all other states around the national average.

Dentists tended to work slightly fewer hours per week (37.4) in 2009 than they did in 2000 (39.3).

The dental labour force is made up of dentists, dental specialists and allied practitioners, including dental hygienists, dental therapists, oral health therapists and dental prosthetists.

“In 2009, the Australian dental labour force was dominated by general dental practitioners, with 11,900 dentists making up 67 per cent of the workforce. Among these, 4 in every 5 worked in the private sector,” Professor Roberts-Thomson said.

The remaining labour force was mostly made up of dental therapists (8 per cent), prosthetists (7 per cent), hygienists (6 per cent) and oral health therapists (4 per cent).

“There were around 1,440 dental specialists in Australia in 2009, and orthodontists were the largest specialty group, making up 39 per cent,” Professor Roberts-Thomson said.

There were around 3,800 allied dental practitioners in Australia in 2009. Almost all dental hygienists, dental therapists and oral health therapists were women, while nearly 90 per cent of the 1,000 or more practising dental prosthetists were men.

The average age of dentists has increased from 44.3 to 45.2 years between 2000 and 2009.

The number of female dentists increased from 2,042 to 3,869 between 2000 and 2009.

 

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http://bitemagazine.com.au/news_blog/index.php/number-of-dentists-grows/?utm_source=News+Bites+June+15The number of dentists working in Australia is rising, and capital cities continue to have more dentists per capita than other areas, according to a report released today by the Australian institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).

The report, Trends in the Australian dental labour force, 2000 to 2009, shows an overall increase in the supply of dentists (including dental specialists) across Australia in the decade to 2009—from 46.9 to 54.1 practising dentists per 100,000 people.

The number of dentists per 100,000 people in Major cities was double that in Outer regional areas, and almost triple that in Remote/Very remote areas.

“While the number of dentists in regional and remote areas is still well below major cities, there have been increases in the number of dentists in all remoteness areas between 2000 and 2009,” said AIHW spokesperson Professor Kaye Roberts-Thomson.

These increases have ranged from 9 per cent in Outer regional areas to 40 per cent in Remote/Very remote areas.

Supply was highest in the Australian Capital Territory and lowest in Tasmania and the Northern Territory, with all other states around the national average.

Dentists tended to work slightly fewer hours per week (37.4) in 2009 than they did in 2000 (39.3).

The dental labour force is made up of dentists, dental specialists and allied practitioners, including dental hygienists, dental therapists, oral health therapists and dental prosthetists.

“In 2009, the Australian dental labour force was dominated by general dental practitioners, with 11,900 dentists making up 67 per cent of the workforce. Among these, 4 in every 5 worked in the private sector,” Professor Roberts-Thomson said.

The remaining labour force was mostly made up of dental therapists (8 per cent), prosthetists (7 per cent), hygienists (6 per cent) and oral health therapists (4 per cent).

“There were around 1,440 dental specialists in Australia in 2009, and orthodontists were the largest specialty group, making up 39 per cent,” Professor Roberts-Thomson said.

There were around 3,800 allied dental practitioners in Australia in 2009. Almost all dental hygienists, dental therapists and oral health therapists were women, while nearly 90 per cent of the 1,000 or more practising dental prosthetists were men.

The average age of dentists has increased from 44.3 to 45+2012&utm_campaign=News+Bites+June+15&utm_medium=email

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Introducing Lingual Orthodontics!


Lingual braces work in much the same way as their traditional counterparts. However there’s one important cosmetic difference; the lack of the usual metal supports on the front of your teeth. In the past braces could only be fit in a certain position; right on the front of your teeth but due to developments in dental technology this is no longer the case. The key difference with Lingual Braces is that they can be placed on the rear of your teeth, hiding the majority of the metal parts. This means that they can realign your teeth just as effectively as a traditional brace but without the aesthetic worries. http://www.smileforlife.com/lingual-braces.html

Call us today to chat about getting the cheapest price in Melbourne!!!  03 9575 1100

 

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